The NK 2000 Project

The NK 2000 Project

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Matching Numbers


Freshly Sealed

Two different seals went on the car this week- the trunk seal, which was long overdue to be changed, and the passenger side door wing seal, which had pretty much disintegrated with the passage of decades.

The door seal was easy enough to install, after figuring out how to defy gravity and allow that nasty but effective black 3M sealant to dry.


I have heard that this seal is NLA but W&N still has them in stock.


The trunk seal proved to be more problematic with its own gravity issues. I even thought of taking the trunk off the car to do the installation, but in the final analysis it was easier to take the problem to Patrick at Midnight Motorsport and have him do the work. It turned out nicely.



Saturday, August 9, 2014

Rear-End Records Deleted

I'm the first person to admit it - occaisionally I get absent-minded. This used to be especially distressing when I would forget to close the trunk before lowering the garage door.


What happened is that the bottom of the metal door track, which slides backward when the door is going down, used to hit the rear trunk trim. Thus I had a record, over the years, of how many times I had done this.


Depending on the position of the car at the time, the ding that that resulted when I lowered the door used to hit near the center-left of the trunk trim.  Here I count around six episodes, although there is evidence of more out of the picture frame.

Anyhow, the cost of a new piece of trim isn't really very high. I also replaced the small trim connector pieces, which were aged and nasty.  Result - a pristine, record-free transom.

I

I only attempted this fix after going for at least a year ding-free, proving that an old person CAN learn new tricks.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The B-Pillar Interior Trim

Ever since I took possesion of the car, the left side B-Pillar trim had a crack right through it, very obvious and plain to see. My theory is that - well, I haven't the slightest idea why this happened. I never photograhed the defect because it detracted from the nice conditon of the rest of the car. But here it is, after I removed the trim from the car. Oddly, both sides popped right out.  Seldom on an NK does any part just snap off easily; usually each item is attached to several others, requiring complicated disassembly. But not this time.


Except for a msyterious piece of masking tape on each side of the car, underneath the trim the metal was clean and rust-free.


I had bought from Germany two used trim pieces, with a view to replacing both. Because they were black, they had to be painted to match. Luckily I found a version of Rustoleum spray paint that was an identical match, nearly.

I painted the trim on the floor of the garage on a wet, rainy day. The pieces took forever to dry.


What was really astonishing was how close the color match proved to be. I moved the newly painted pieces to the hood of the car and placed one of the old pieces beside them for comparision.


The original part from the car is on the left in the above photo. The newly-painted pieces look glossier because they are still damp.

Lastly, I noticed that the bolts that hold the seat belt in place had once been painted also, whether or not in the factory I had no way of knowing. But I decided to repaint them, too.


I had to wait about eight hours for the paint to dry sufficiently to put the new trim back in the car. The project was a great success, approved by all concerned.


Toward the bottom on this side was where the old trim piece had cracked in half. Now gone, vansished without a trace!





Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Slowly Sorting Interior Colours

I saw a tip on the FAQ forum from a woman who makes high-quality upholstery and carpets, about a company that faithfully reproduces BMW interior vinyl colours. So I ordered a small bottle of black paint with a view toward restoring the A-pillar trim to black, which I am quite sure was the factory hue for all NK interiors.  The paint went on smoothly with good coverage and now the car has yet another element of its original interior.








Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Mistaken Project / Great New Look

Yesterday I repainted my rear parcel shelf to black, thinking that was the factory colour. Well... as they say, "Oops." It's been pointed out to me that the shelf colours were coordinated with the rest of each car's interior hue. So I am now searching for some braun vinyl paint to correct my egregious, if forgivable error.

Live, learn, and move on.

At least I didn't make a mistake when I ordered the NOS beauty rings, which I quickly added to my steelies, and then proudly posed the car for a blog cover photo highlighting the new look.

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Rattle Be Gone!

My drivers side window had been rattling ever since I bought the car.  I got some advice from an expert, who suggested changing the outer chrome window trim on the door. The rubber that protects the inside of the door from rain had pretty much worn out and no longer rested against the window. According to this theory the window itself, no longer held firmly in place, might be subject to rattling.

Well, something was making the thing rattle. The only times it was quiet was when the window was either fully closed or fully open.

The first problem was to remove the piece. Turned out a plastic snow scraper, wedged underneath the chrome trim, could be whacked with a hammer to lift it off.


And so I removed the trim. Metal clips inside on the door seam held the trim firmly.

But, when examining the new item I bought from BMW, I discovered that it had a felt insert that prevented the chrome from sliding back into the seam.

Using the same snow scraper, this time placed on top of the trim piece, I whacked hard and it slowly dropped into place.

No more rattling window when I close the door or when I'm driving with it half-open, and no more jokes about rattle-trap old cars when cynical passengers acoompany me for a ride.